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Thesis

The nature of configurationality in LFG

Abstract:

The central issue in this thesis is configurationality, which has broadly been defined in terms of a division of the world's languages based on their core syntactic structure. Specifically, languages are traditionally divided into so-called configurational and non-configurational languages. Configurational languages are assumed to be languages with many restrictions on word order, and non-configurational languages are assumed to be languages with very few or no word order restrictions. Man...

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Division:
HUMS
Department:
Linguistics Philology and Phonetics Faculty
Department:
Faculty of Linguistics, Philology & Phonetics
Role:
Author

Contributors

Department:
Faculty of Linguistics, Philology & Phonetics
Role:
Supervisor
Department:
Faculty of Linguistics, Philology & Phonetics
Role:
Supervisor
Arts and Humanities Research Coundil More from this funder
Gen Foundation More from this funder
Type of award:
DPhil
Level of award:
Doctoral
Awarding institution:
University of Oxford
Language:
English
Keywords:
Subjects:
UUID:
uuid:1310f160-283e-411e-a8d7-20ab4b3380c2
Deposit date:
2015-11-13

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